fbpx
31.3 C
Canberra
Tuesday, April 20, 2021

Fresh as a newly discovered daisy

A delicate new daisy has popped up on the Redlands Coast radar.

Redland City Mayor, Karen Williams said the Slender Bottle-daisy (Lagenophora gracilis) was found by the native nursery coordinator of Council’s IndigiScapes Centre during a recent seed collecting trip in the Leslie Harrison Conservation Area at Capalaba.

“The Community Bushcare team was out braving the heat to collect native plant seeds and fruits that the nursery needs for propagation when they came across this little flower alongside the path to the Leslie Harrison Dam,” Mayor Williams said.

“It caught the eye of nursery coordinator, Ben Webb who thought it looked unusual, so he took some photos and discovered this fragile flower has previously never been recorded as growing in Redlands Coast.

“The Slender Bottle-daisy does occur in eastern Australia but its normal habitat is the floor of eucalyptus forests.

“It’s possible it has been growing at the site for some time, but simply remained undiscovered because it’s not a high-traffic area and it wasn’t flowering. It was growing under heavy canopy so obviously needs a shady spot and a particular type of soil and light.”

Mr Webb has returned to the site to locate the plant again, check for flowers and seeds for hopeful propagation.

Redland City Division 9 Councillor, Adelia Berridge said the Slender Bottle-daisy discovery was very exciting.

“We really want to encourage people to look after this fragile gem,” Cr Berridge said.

“Anyone in the Leslie Harrison Conservation Area might be lucky enough to see it for themselves, when it’s in flower.”

A close-up of the daisy which has a dark green rosette.

While Bushcare volunteers work to provide seeds and fruits required for propagation, the IndigiScapes nursery has a separate team of volunteers who help sort and propagate seeds along with Mr Webb.

More information about how to volunteer on these teams can be found on Council’s website, where a calendar details where and when future seed collection trips will take place throughout the year.

Cr Williams said the discovery has really highlighted a wonderful way volunteers could contribute to the knowledge and preservation of our Redlands Coast environment.

“Many of the Bushcare volunteers are regulars who have been collecting seeds on these trips for years, and so have built up a considerable level of expertise,” she said.

“The trips are also a chance for participants to socialise and get fitter in the outdoors, and to discover Redlands Coast reserves they haven’t been to before.”

If you have an interest in Council’s Indigiscapes Native Nursery and its programs please go to the website.

Latest Articles

Flu tracking system captures COVID-19 impact

One of the largest crowd-sourced public health surveillance systems in the world, known for detecting the spread of influenza, has revealed how...

Empowering older Australians in cancer treatment decisions

A new resource is empowering older Australians living with cancer to discuss and prioritise their needs when making decisions about treatment and...

Melbourne Chamber Orchestra music to ears of Mildura

Melbourne Chamber Orchestra (MCO) will bring The Brothers Bach to Mildura Arts Centre this month in the second of two nationally-renowned classical...

Monet wish granted for St Hedwig residents

Residents from St Hedwig Village Residential Aged Care in Blacktown, Sydney, had one excursion in mind for their MyWish. They...

Tip-off leads police divers to dam in unsolved murder case

A tip-off from a member of the public has led cold case detectives and police divers to the state’s Hunter Region this...
X